Climate Change Regulation Through Litigation: New York’s Investigation of ExxonMobil under the Martin Act

Chris Erickson   This post is part of the Environmental Law Review Syndicate. Read the original here and leave a comment. In November 2015, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman began an investigation into whether ExxonMobil made public statements about climate change that conflicted with its own internal research.[i] Schneiderman issued a subpoena to ExxonMobil ordering production of documents related to its internal climate change research and the use of…

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Issue 24.2: Articles Now Available Online!

The Articles and Note from ELJ’s second issue of Volume 24 are now available for online reading. Click the links below to check out our latest publication!   Jess R. Phelps, Preserving National Historic Landmarks? Jeremy Suttenberg, Who Pays? The Consequences of State Versus Operator Liability Within the Context of Transboundary Environmental  Nuclear Damage Note: Martha Fitzgerald, Prison or Precaution: Unilateral, State-Mandated Geoengineering Under Principles of International Environmental Law The full contents of…

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The Legislative History of the National Park Service’s Conservation and Nonimpairment Mandate

By Caitlin Brown Caitlin Brown is a 3L at Berkeley Law and Co-Editor in Chief of Ecology Law Quarterly.   This post is part of the Environmental Law Review Syndicate (ELRS).  Read the original at Ecology Law Quarterly’s website.  Introduction The National Park Service manages over 84 million acres of land divided between 413 different sites, and in 2015 alone, served 307.2 million visitors.[1] Their management goals are based on…

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Our Money Is Safe, But The Planet is Not: How The Carbon Bubble Will Cause Havoc For The Environment, But Not The Stock Market

By Breanna Hayes, Managing Editor, Vermont Journal of Environmental Law. This post is part of the Environmental Law Review Syndicate. I. Introduction Human use of fossil fuels dates back to prehistoric times.[1]  Before the Industrial Revolution, humans mostly relied on wood, wind, and water as energy sources.[2]  But as the Industrial Revolution progressed, humans developed a dependence on fossil fuels.[3]  In addition, the advancements of the Industrial Revolution allowed for…

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The Importance of GIS in Emergency Management

By Monika Holser, UCLA School of Law, Class of 2018 This post is part of the Environmental Law Review Syndicate. Read the original here and leave a comment. GIS (geographic information system) is a computer system for “capturing, storing, checking, and displaying data related to positions on the Earth’s surface.”[1]  It allows multiple layers of information to be displayed at once, enabling one to visualize and understand relationships on a…

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